New Set Announcement: Thureophoroi!

New Set Announcement: Thureophoroi!

A new set is coming for our FIRST EMPIRES range: Thureophoroi! But first we need your help. We'd like you to take a look at what we have here so far and make any suggestions. Primarily we believe the thuros (shield) is not the right shape and needs to be more narrow? Let us know your thoughts below!

An incomplete selection of unique parts from the set.

 

Above are some 3D prints of the test sculpts to give you a better idea of the assembled figures.

 

To learn more about the famed Thureophoroi have a look at Jeff Jonas' wonderful article on AncientBattles.com:

https://ancientbattles.com/thureophoroi/thureophoroi.htm

 

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Comments

Harrison - August 2, 2022

I’m looking forward to these guys so much – just as much (maybe even more in some ways) than the squamata legionaries, Trojan Chariot and the Egyptians.

Robert Huey - January 28, 2022

They look amazing. So glad to see you moving into the ancient world. Add optional javelins behind the shields and some cloaks to the kit and you’re golden!

Don Williams - December 28, 2021

My club wargames with Saga ‘Age of Hannibal’ rules. Thureophoroi are one of the versitile mercenary units that we have been wanting to create, but have been very dissatisfied with the Warlord Games plastic version. I’ve been very impressed with the high quality and durability of WA plastic minis, and this kit looks like it will fit the bill quite nicely.

Suggestion: add a few arms with slings to the sprue to increase versitility — everyone is always need of generic slingers!

SGZ - May 25, 2021

These look great. To me the archetypal ( perhaps stereotypical ) theurophori has a cloak and above ankle lace up boots, flat oblong shield and helmet. Hopefully these will mostly fit that style although a few different options would be nice. Something like 1 figure w sandals, some bare heads… etc.

Irvin Goron - May 24, 2021

Great idea! Fills an obvious gap in current 28mm plastic offerings for this period and as such should prove popular with those building up Successor and later Greek armies. I’d echo the comments on versatility too- could be customised into many ancient troop types with minimal conversion with components from other sets.
From my point of view I’d like to see long spear right arm options and cloaks for all figures in the set as this seems to be the most common armament/costume seen in the ancient representations of Thueophoroi.
I’m looking forward to the release of these figures and I’ll certainly be investing in a few sets.

Jeff Jonas - May 21, 2021

The cloaks are certainly optional. In combat they probably were not worn on sunny days. But the thureophoroi did the dirty work of protecting the camp and supplies, to operating in bad conditions on the misty morning rocky ground, to standing guard in important garrisons. Cloaks are certainly appropriate also because fancy cloaks were a typical reward of Successor kings as well as kausiae caps. I like the fancy cloaked thureophoroi as well as uncloaked, as they are depicted in sources either way.

Axel - May 8, 2021

> hugely oversized Victrix
I have no idea how many Victrix you actually own, but I have a copy of each of their ancient kits, and have kitbashed their Persians happily with those of Wargames Atlantic, swapping arms and heads. The number of heads in the WA kits is freakingly good, and compensates for Victrix lack of difference in style there. Wargames Atlantic and Victrix Persians happily mix and match on the same miniature and with different minis on the same base without visible problems.

I ope, and are actually quite sure, that these Thuereophoi will fit in neatly with Vs Macedonian and Greek ranges.

Marc - May 8, 2021

Looking very good so far.
How about going the easy route and repurposing several paarts of the set for a second set of Thorakitai?
These would complement each other nicely.

JT - May 8, 2021

I love this kit! I appreciate the messages of all the historical folks out there and I recognize their priorities. Oddly, I plan to use this awesome kit for fantasy skirmish. I like the cloaks, the weapon variety, and could do with some more head variety (in keeping with the historical aspect of the kit). Do what you will with the shield, I am sure it will look great. Keep up the good work.

Pierre Lerdou-Udoy - May 7, 2021

Long capes are bad weather cloaks, not very accurate. Greeks or Macedonians peasants and warriors wore instead chlamys, chlamydes… and Romans Paenulae. Cape is Hollywood bullshit. But Kopis and Xyphos for versatility : yes !!!

If the origin of such a shield is “gallic” (adapted from the shields of Keltoi, Galatoi), the hand grip was certainly horizontal, made for infantry hard close combat on a offensive and defensive way (raids, rapid assaults). It was certainly flat (or very slightly curved : in this case, no javelins).
Gauls, Iberians, Celtiberians, Celts from central Europe (Illyrian and Germans too) used this kind of shield (there’s a lot of archeological evidences).
Romans have adopted it in changing the shape (from flat to curved one, but the hand gripping system is the same).
You can see with advantage : Les umbos de boucliers de Gournay-sur-Aronde (André Rapin, pdf) or Le maniement du bouclier celte (J-F. Gilles, pdf). Schemas and illustrations are clear enough for you (that’s in french). Sorry, I don’t know any good studies in english.
You will then compare the shape and gripping system with a british celtic ceremonial shield found in the Thames : the Chertsey shield (now in the British Museum). Dimensions : 83,6 cm x 46,8 cm.

Be brave, and go ahead.

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